Health

Mental Health in the Workplace

There is still a stigma attached to mental health problems, but fortunately, things are improving as it is talked about increasingly in the public arena. However, many people still feel uncomfortable talking about mental health issues and this can stop them from getting help and weigh them down for a long time.

Mental health problems have a wide range of effects; it could be as simple as having a setback and struggling to shrug off how that makes you feel, or it can run much deeper and be part of your everyday life which can, as we know, lead to serious long-term conditions.

The vast majority of people who suffer mental health problems can recover, or at the very least learn to live with them, especially if they get help early on. There is a wide scope of diagnoses that clinicians use to classify symptoms into groups.

A few common mental health issues are:

  • stress (whilst not classed as a medical condition, it can still have a serious impact on wellbeing and is the cause of many lost work hours in the west)
  • depression
  • anxiety

Less common conditions include:

  • bipolar disorder
  • schizophrenia

As an employer, you have a ‘duty of care to your employees. This means not only that they are physically safe; working environment, equipment and protected from discrimination, but also that their mental well-being is considered. Also, a mental health issue can be considered a disability under the law, and employers must be vigilant not to discriminate against an employee because of their disability.

In order to get a better understanding of the issues and ensure as an employer, you are aware of and can help employees who are suffering from mental health issues, it is advisable to get your line managers trained. They have day-to-day contact with the workforce and are best placed to talk to any employee who needs help. A Mental Health in the Workplace training course, like those provided by Centaur Training will, help line managers become more mental health aware. This course covers a number of areas including:

  • Recognising possible signs and symptoms of a person that has mental ill-health
  • Understanding Mental Health and its stigma
  • Using a Mental Health Action Plan to help those in crisis or need
  • Finding external professional help and guidance
  • The law in relation to mental health and the workplace
  • Best practice in the workplace

This is a one-day course and FAIB (First Aid Industry Body) accredited.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button